• August 12, 2020
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    Today's Labor History


    This week’s Labor History Today podcast: Remembering Gene Debs; Waging Peace
    Shubert Sebree remembers Eugene Debs. Professor Laura McEnaney, author of Postwar: Waging Peace in Chicago, on the fate of labor's complex New Deal coalition and connecting the essential workers of the 1940s with those fighting today’s war against the pandemic.
    Plus Joe Glazer and The Ballad of Eugene Victor Debs, and this week’s Labor History in 2: Workers Pay the Price for Bad Management
    Last week’s show: No longer newsworthy?

    The Air Line Pilots Association is founded at a meeting in Chicago attended by 24 activists from across the country - 1931

    Hundreds of Transport Workers Union members descend on a New York City courthouse, offering their own money to bail out their president, Mike Quill, and four other union leaders arrested while making their way through Grand Central Station to union headquarters after picketing the IRT subway company offices in lower Manhattan - 1935

    President Roosevelt signs amendments to the 1935 Social Security Act, broadening the program to include dependents and survivors' benefits - 1939

    Construction on the St. Lawrence Seaway begins. Ultimately 22,000 workers spent five years building the 2,342 mile route from the Atlantic to the northernmost part of the Great Lakes. Employees of the St. Lawrence Seaway are represented today by AFGE Local 1968 - 1954

    Pres. Barack Obama signs a $26 billion bill designed to protect 300,000 teachers, police and others from layoffs spurred by budgetary crises in states hard-hit by the Great Recession - 2010


    - David Prosten

    Today's Labor Quote: I.W. Abel

    ''Collective bargaining is pretty much of a crisis business. You have to have patience and you have to be tolerant. You have to be a fair fisherman. You have to sit back and wait for a bite.''

    Abel -- better known as "Abe" -- was president of the United Steel Workers of America from 1965 to 1977, and died on this date in 1987 at the age of 79. In one year, he led 42 wildcat walkouts.

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    The National Voter Registration Form
    The National Mail Voter Registration Form allows you to register to vote from anywhere in the United States. Be sure to follow the General Instructions, as well as the specific instructions for your State, contained in the PDF download. Visit the Election Assistance Commission website for more information.

    Who Can Use the NVR Form
    If you are a U.S. citizen who lives or has an address within the United States, you can use this form to:

    • Register to vote in your State
    • Report a change of name to your voter registration office
    • Report a change of address to your voter registration office
    • Register with a political party
    • Not all states accept the NVR form printed on white paper, make sure to verify that your state will accept this form. State instructions are included at the end of the form.
    • Exceptions: North Dakota does not have voter registration; Wyoming, by State law, cannot accept the National Form; and New Hampshire town and city clerks will accept the National Form only as a request for their own mail-in absentee voter registration form.

    Please do not use this application if you live outside the United States and its territories and have no home (legal) address in this country, or if you are in the military stationed away from home. Use the Federal Postcard Application available to you from military bases, American embassies, or consular offices.

    Eligibility
    Each State has its own laws about who may register and vote.

    Note: All States require that you be a United States citizen by birth or naturalization to register to vote in federal and State elections. Federal law makes it illegal to falsely claim US citizenship to register to vote in any federal, State or local election. Also Note: You cannot be registered to vote in more than one place at a time.

    Where can I register to vote in my local town?
    Registration applications may be obtained from either the local election official in your county or city, or through registration outreach programs sponsored by such groups as the League of Women Voters. In addition, you can also register to vote when applying for a driver’s license or identity card at State DMV or driver's licensing offices, State offices providing public assistance, State offices providing State-funded programs for the disabled, and at armed forces recruitment offices.

    Many States also offer registration opportunities at public libraries, post offices, unemployment offices, and at public high schools and universities. Colleges, universities, and trade schools participating in federal student loan programs also offer voter registration applications to enrolled students prior to general elections.

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