• August 12, 2020
    Member Login
    Username:

    Password:


    Not registered yet?
    Click Here to sign-up

    Forgot Your Login?
    Download Our App!

    << August 2020 >>
    S M T W T F S
    1
    2 3 4 5 6 7 8
    9 10 11 12 13 14 15
    16 17 18 19 20 21 22
    23 24 25 26 27 28 29
    30 31

    Today's Labor History

    This week’s Labor History Today podcast: Remembering Gene Debs; Waging Peace
    Shubert Sebree remembers Eugene Debs. Professor Laura McEnaney, author of Postwar: Waging Peace in Chicago, on the fate of labor's complex New Deal coalition and connecting the essential workers of the 1940s with those fighting today’s war against the pandemic.
    Plus Joe Glazer and The Ballad of Eugene Victor Debs, and this week’s Labor History in 2: Workers Pay the Price for Bad Management
    Last week’s show: No longer newsworthy?

    August 12
    The national Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners is founded in Chicago in a gathering of 36 carpenters from 11 cities - 1881

    What was to become a 232-day strike by Major League Baseball players over owners' demands for team salary caps began on this day; 938 games were cancelled - 1994

    August 13
    Striking miners at Tracy City, Tenn., capture their mines and free 300 state convict strikebreakers. The convicts had been "leased" to mineowners by officials in an effort to make prisons self-supporting and make a few bucks for the state. The practice started in 1866 and lasted for 30 years - 1892

    Newspaper Guild members begin three-month strike of Hearst-owned Seattle Post-Intelligencer, shutting the publication down in their successful fight for union recognition - 1936

    Civil rights leader and union president A. Philip Randolph strongly protests the AFL-CIO Executive Council's failure to endorse the August 28 "March on Washington" - 1963

    - David Prosten

    Today’s Labor Quote: Lillian Russell


    “We all have a fear of the unknown. What one does with that fear will make all the difference in the world.”

    Actress and former chorus girl Lillian Russell's financial support helped the chorus girls in the Ziegfield Follies create their own union, the Chorus Equity Association on this date in 1919.

    Contact Elected Officials!
  • Legislative Info
    Dec 05, 2019

    Download: 10_USC_10216_G_Propd_Amndmnt_2_Dec_2019.pdf , Military_Leave_Issue_Paper_ 2_Dec_2019.pdf , TRICARE_(S. 164)_Issue_Paper_2_Dec_2019.pdf , TRICARE_(H.R. 613)_Issue_Paper_ 2_Dec_2019.pdf

    May 30, 2010

    May 30, 2010

    May 30, 2010

    May 07, 2010

    May 07, 2010

    May 07, 2010

    May 07, 2010

    May 07, 2010

    May 07, 2010

    Mar 31, 2011

    May 07, 2010

    May 07, 2010

    HOW TO CONTACT YOUR CONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATIVES
    To find your senators' and representative's phone numbers, you will find a congressional directory on our website www.actnat.com. Look under Contact Congress and use the first drop down tab, simply click on your state. Or you can call the U.S. Capitol Switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask for your senators' and/or representative's office.
    Remember that telephone calls are usually taken by a staff member, not the member of Congress. Ask to speak with the aide who handles the issue about which you wish to comment.
    After identifying yourself, tell the aide you would like to leave a brief message, such as: "Please tell Senator/Representative (Name) that I support/oppose (S.___/H.R.___)."
    You will also want to state reasons for your support or opposition to the bill. Ask for your senators' or representative's position on the bill. You may also request a written response to your telephone call.
      
    Tips On Writing Congress

    The letter is the most popular choice of communication with a congressional office. If you decide to write a letter, this list of helpful suggestions will improve the effectiveness of the letter:  NOTE: it is best to fax the letter rather then use the US Mail Service.
    1. Your purpose for writing should be stated in the first paragraph of the letter. If your letter pertains to a specific piece of legislation, identify it accordingly, e.g., House bill: H. R. ____, Senate bill: S.____.
    2. Be courteous, to the point, and include key information, using examples to support your position.
    3. Address only one issue in each letter; and, if possible, keep the letter to one page.

    Addressing Correspondence:
    To a Senator:
    The Honorable (full name)
    __(Rm.#)__(name of) Senate Office Building
    United States Senate
    Washington, DC 20510

    Dear Senator ____name___:
      
    To a Representative:
    The Honorable (full name)
    __(Rm.#)__(name of) House Office Building
    United States House of Representatives
    Washington, DC 20515

    Dear Representative ___name___
    Note:  When writing to the Chair of a Committee or the Speaker of the House, it is proper to address them as:
    Dear Mr. Chairman or Madam Chairwoman:
    Dear Madam Speaker or Mr. Speaker:
    Tip On E-mailing Congress
    Generally, the same guidelines apply as with writing letters to Congress. You will also find the e-mail address for your senators and representative on the ACT Web site at the Contact Congress Tab.



    Page Last Updated: Dec 06, 2019 (06:08:00)
  • Association of Civilian Technicians

    Copyright © 2020.
    All Rights Reserved.

    Powered By UnionActive



    230188 hits since May 05, 2010


  • Top of Page image