• June 14, 2021
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    Today's Labor Quote: Bartolomeo Vanzetti

    “Never in our full life could we hope to do such work for tolerance, for justice, for man's understanding of man as now we do by accident.”

    Vanzetti, the Italian activist and anarchist, along with Nicola Sacco, went on trial on this date in 1921; they were eventually executed as part of a government campaign against dissidents.

    TODAY'S LABOR HISTORY

    This week’s Labor History Today podcast: Passaic textile strike & LAWCHA preview. Last week’s show: Sea Shanties and the Pleasure of Work  

    May 21
    The “Little Wagner Act” is signed in Hawaii, guaranteeing pineapple and sugar workers the right to bargain collectively.  After negotiations failed a successful 79-day strike shut down 33 of the territory’s 34 plantations and brought higher wages and a 40-hour week - 1945 

    Nearly 100,000 unionized SBC Communications Inc. workers begin a four-day strike to protest the local phone giant’s latest contract offer - 2004 


    May 22
    Eugene V. Debs imprisoned in Woodstock, Ill. for role in Pullman strike - 1895 

    While white locomotive firemen on the Georgia Railroad strike, blacks who are hired as replacements are whipped and stoned -- not by the union men, but by white citizens outraged that blacks are being hired over whites.  The Engineers union threatens to stop work because their members are being affected by the violence - 1909

    Civil Service Retirement Act of 1920 gives federal workers a pension - 1920 

    U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson announces the goals of his Great Society social reforms: to bring “an end to poverty and racial injustice” in America - 1964


    May 23
    An estimated 100,000 textile workers, including more than 10,000 children, strike in the Philadelphia area.  Among the issues: 60-hour workweeks, including night hours, for the children - 1903 

    Ten thousand strikers at Toledo, Ohio’s Auto-Lite plant repel police who have come to break up their strike for union recognition. The next day, two strikers are killed and 15 wounded when National Guard machine gun units open fire. Two weeks later the company recognized the union and agreed to a 5 percent raise - 1934 

    U.S. railroad strike starts, later crushed when President Truman threatens to draft strikers – 1946 

    Contact Elected Officials!
  • Legislative Info
    Dec 05, 2019

    Download: 10_USC_10216_G_Propd_Amndmnt_2_Dec_2019.pdf , Military_Leave_Issue_Paper_ 2_Dec_2019.pdf , TRICARE_(S. 164)_Issue_Paper_2_Dec_2019.pdf , TRICARE_(H.R. 613)_Issue_Paper_ 2_Dec_2019.pdf

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    HOW TO CONTACT YOUR CONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATIVES
    To find your senators' and representative's phone numbers, you will find a congressional directory on our website www.actnat.com. Look under Contact Congress and use the first drop down tab, simply click on your state. Or you can call the U.S. Capitol Switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask for your senators' and/or representative's office.
    Remember that telephone calls are usually taken by a staff member, not the member of Congress. Ask to speak with the aide who handles the issue about which you wish to comment.
    After identifying yourself, tell the aide you would like to leave a brief message, such as: "Please tell Senator/Representative (Name) that I support/oppose (S.___/H.R.___)."
    You will also want to state reasons for your support or opposition to the bill. Ask for your senators' or representative's position on the bill. You may also request a written response to your telephone call.
      
    Tips On Writing Congress

    The letter is the most popular choice of communication with a congressional office. If you decide to write a letter, this list of helpful suggestions will improve the effectiveness of the letter:  NOTE: it is best to fax the letter rather then use the US Mail Service.
    1. Your purpose for writing should be stated in the first paragraph of the letter. If your letter pertains to a specific piece of legislation, identify it accordingly, e.g., House bill: H. R. ____, Senate bill: S.____.
    2. Be courteous, to the point, and include key information, using examples to support your position.
    3. Address only one issue in each letter; and, if possible, keep the letter to one page.

    Addressing Correspondence:
    To a Senator:
    The Honorable (full name)
    __(Rm.#)__(name of) Senate Office Building
    United States Senate
    Washington, DC 20510

    Dear Senator ____name___:
      
    To a Representative:
    The Honorable (full name)
    __(Rm.#)__(name of) House Office Building
    United States House of Representatives
    Washington, DC 20515

    Dear Representative ___name___
    Note:  When writing to the Chair of a Committee or the Speaker of the House, it is proper to address them as:
    Dear Mr. Chairman or Madam Chairwoman:
    Dear Madam Speaker or Mr. Speaker:
    Tip On E-mailing Congress
    Generally, the same guidelines apply as with writing letters to Congress. You will also find the e-mail address for your senators and representative on the ACT Web site at the Contact Congress Tab.



    Page Last Updated: Dec 06, 2019 (06:08:00)
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