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    January 21, 2020
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    Today's Labor History

    This week’s Labor History Today podcast: UAW’s Punch Press strike daily
    On today’s show, the Cool Things from the Meany Archives crew features The Punch Press, an auto worker strike publication. Also this week, Saul Schniderman remembers contributions to labor history by both Johnny Paycheck and Bruce Springsteen.
    Last week's show: (1/5): A very unusual strike

    Wednesday, January 15
    Martin Luther King, Jr. born - 1929

    The CIO miners' union in the Grass Valley area of California strikes for higher wages, union recognition, and the 8 hour day. The strike was defeated when vigilantes and law enforcement officials expelled 400 miners and their families from the area - 1938

    The Pentagon, to this day the largest office building in the world, is dedicated just 16 months after groundbreaking. At times of peak employment 13,000 workers labored on the project - 1943


    Thursday, January 16
    The United States Civil Service Commission was established as the Pendleton Act went into effect - 1883

    Thousands of Palmer Raids detainees win right to meet with lawyers and attorney representation at deportation hearings. "Palmer" was Alexander Mitchell Palmer, U.S. Attorney General under Woodrow Wilson. Palmer said Communism was "eating its way into the homes of the American workman," and blamed Socialists for causing most of the country's social problems - 1920

    Former UAW President Leonard Woodcock dies in Ann Arbor, Mich. at age 89. He had succeeded Walter Reuther and led the union from 1970 to 1977 - 2001


    - David Prosten; photo: Aftermath of Palmer raid on the IWW (International Workers of the World) office in New York, November 15, 1919. 

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  • Legislative Info
    Dec 05, 2019

    Download: 10_USC_10216_G_Propd_Amndmnt_2_Dec_2019.pdf , Military_Leave_Issue_Paper_ 2_Dec_2019.pdf , TRICARE_(S. 164)_Issue_Paper_2_Dec_2019.pdf , TRICARE_(H.R. 613)_Issue_Paper_ 2_Dec_2019.pdf

    May 30, 2010

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    Mar 31, 2011

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    May 07, 2010

    HOW TO CONTACT YOUR CONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATIVES
    To find your senators' and representative's phone numbers, you will find a congressional directory on our website www.actnat.com. Look under Contact Congress and use the first drop down tab, simply click on your state. Or you can call the U.S. Capitol Switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask for your senators' and/or representative's office.
    Remember that telephone calls are usually taken by a staff member, not the member of Congress. Ask to speak with the aide who handles the issue about which you wish to comment.
    After identifying yourself, tell the aide you would like to leave a brief message, such as: "Please tell Senator/Representative (Name) that I support/oppose (S.___/H.R.___)."
    You will also want to state reasons for your support or opposition to the bill. Ask for your senators' or representative's position on the bill. You may also request a written response to your telephone call.
      
    Tips On Writing Congress

    The letter is the most popular choice of communication with a congressional office. If you decide to write a letter, this list of helpful suggestions will improve the effectiveness of the letter:  NOTE: it is best to fax the letter rather then use the US Mail Service.
    1. Your purpose for writing should be stated in the first paragraph of the letter. If your letter pertains to a specific piece of legislation, identify it accordingly, e.g., House bill: H. R. ____, Senate bill: S.____.
    2. Be courteous, to the point, and include key information, using examples to support your position.
    3. Address only one issue in each letter; and, if possible, keep the letter to one page.

    Addressing Correspondence:
    To a Senator:
    The Honorable (full name)
    __(Rm.#)__(name of) Senate Office Building
    United States Senate
    Washington, DC 20510

    Dear Senator ____name___:
      
    To a Representative:
    The Honorable (full name)
    __(Rm.#)__(name of) House Office Building
    United States House of Representatives
    Washington, DC 20515

    Dear Representative ___name___
    Note:  When writing to the Chair of a Committee or the Speaker of the House, it is proper to address them as:
    Dear Mr. Chairman or Madam Chairwoman:
    Dear Madam Speaker or Mr. Speaker:
    Tip On E-mailing Congress
    Generally, the same guidelines apply as with writing letters to Congress. You will also find the e-mail address for your senators and representative on the ACT Web site at the Contact Congress Tab.



    Page Last Updated: Dec 06, 2019 (06:08:00)
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