• October 20, 2017
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    The Week in Labor History

    October 16
    Queen Marie Antoinette, wife of Louis XVI, is beheaded during the French Revolution.   When alerted that the peasants were suffering due to widespread bread shortages, lore has it that she replied, “Let them eat cake.”  In fact she never said that, but workers were, justifiably, ready to believe anything bad about their cold-hearted royalty - 1793
     
    Abolitionist John Brown leads 18 men, including five free Blacks, in an attack on the Harper's Ferry ammunition depot, the beginning of guerilla warfare against slavery - 1859  


    October 17
    A huge vat ruptures at a London brewery, setting off a domino effect of similar ruptures, and what was to become known as The London Beer Flood.  Nearly 1.5 million liters of beer gushed into the streets drowning or otherwise causing the deaths of eight people, mostly poor people living in nearby basements - 1814
     
    Labor activist Warren Billings is released from California's Folsom Prison. Along with Thomas J. Mooney, Billings had been pardoned for a 1916 conviction stemming from a bomb explosion during a San Francisco Preparedness Day parade. He had always maintained his innocence - 1939
     
    "Salt of the Earth" strike begins by the mostly Mexican-American members of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers Union Local 890 in Bayard, N.M. Strikers' wives walked picket lines for seven months when their husbands were enjoined during the 14-month strike against the New Jersey Zinc Co. A great movie, see it! - 1950
    (Working Stiffs, Union Maids, Reds, and Riffraff: An Expanded Guide to Films About Labor: This wonderful book is an encyclopedic guide to 350 labor films from around the world, ranging from those you’ve heard of—Salt of the Earth, The Grapes of Wrath, Roger & Me—to those you’ve never heard of but will fall in love with once you see them.)
     
    Twelve New York City firefighters die fighting a blaze in midtown Manhattan - 1966
     
    Int’l Printing Pressmen's & Assistants' Union of North America merges with Int’l Stereotypers', Electrotypers' & Platemakers' Union to become Printing & Graphic Communications Union - 1973
     
    Industrial Union of Marine & Shipbuilding Workers of America merges with Int’l Association of Machinists & Aerospace Workers - 1988
     
    October 18
    The "Shoemakers of Boston"—the first labor organization in what would later become the United States—was authorized by the Massachusetts Bay Colony - 1648
     
    New York City agrees to pay women school teachers a rate equal to that of men - 1911
     
    IWW Colorado Mine strike; first time all coal fields are out - 1927
     
    Some 58,000 Chrysler Corp. workers strike for wage increases - 1939
     
    The United Packinghouse Workers of America (UPWA) was formed as a self-governing union, an outgrowth of the CIO's Packinghouse Workers Organizing Committee. UPWA merged with the Meatcutters union in 1968, which merged with the Retail Clerks in 1979 to form the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) - 1943
     
    GM agrees to hire more women and minorities for five years as part of a settlement with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission - 1983
    (Sisters in the Brotherhoods: Working Women Organizing for Equality: Many blue-collar arenas remain contested terrain for females. Women still struggle to get training, to get jobs, and to secure a harassment-free workplace. Despite the efforts of the pioneering generation, females still enter these jobs one by one and two by two and only against great odds do they remain there. These oral histories explore the achievements of the women who made history simply by going to work every day.)

    October 19
    The National Association of Letter Carriers achieves equalization of wages for all letter carriers, meaning city delivery carriers began receiving the same wages regardless of the size of the community in which they worked – 1949

    The J.P. Stevens textile company is forced to sign its first union contract after a 17-year struggle in North Carolina and other southern states - 1980
     
    October 20
    Eugene V. Debs, U.S. labor leader and socialist, dies in Elmhurst, Ill. Among his radical ideas: an 8-hour workday, pensions, workman's compensation, sick leave and social security. He ran for president from a jail cell in 1920 and got a million votes - 1926
     
    Hollywood came under scrutiny as the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) opened hearings into alleged Communist influence within the motion picture industry. Dozens of union members were among those blacklisted as a result of HUAC’s activities - 1947
     
    Presidential candidate Ronald Reagan writes to PATCO President Robert Poli with this promise: if the union endorses Reagan, "I will take whatever steps are necessary to provide our air traffic controllers with the most modern equipment available and to adjust staff levels and work days so that they are commensurate with achieving a maximum degree of public safety." He got the endorsement. Nine months after the election, he fires the air traffic controllers for engaging in an illegal walkout over staffing levels and working conditions - 1980
     
    Death of Merle Travis, songwriter and performer who wrote "Sixteen Tons" and "Dark as a Dungeon" – 1983

    Two track workers are killed in a (San Francisco) Bay Area Rapid Transit train accident.  Federal investigators said the train was run by a BART employee who was being trained as an operator as members of the Amalgamated Transit Union were participating in what was to be a four-day strike - 2013

    October 21
    Wisconsin dairy farmers begin their third strike of the year in an attempt to raise the price of milk paid to producers during the Great Depression.  Several creameries were bombed before the strike ended a month later. The economy eventually improved, allowing the farmers to make more money - 1933
     
    October 22
    Bank robber Charles Arthur "Pretty Boy" Floyd is killed by FBI agents near East Liverpool, Ohio. He was a hero to the people of Oklahoma who saw him as a "Sagebrush Robin Hood," stealing from banks and sharing some of the proceeds with the poor - 1934

    - compiled/edited by David Prosten at Union Communication Services

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  • Morgan Stanley - Mike Svec
    Updated On: Feb 09, 2017

    Michael Svec CFP®

    Senior Vice President

    INVESTMENT CONSULTING PROCESS

    Step 1:   Understanding you and your expectations

    One of the keys to investment success is to clearly define your objectives, your financial needs and your tolerance for risk. 

    Step 2:   Developing a customized investment strategy and profile

    Using information gathered on your personal preferences, we would design an optimal combination of diversified investments to help you achieve your goals. 

    Step 3:   Analyzing and selecting appropriate investment alternatives

    Because of my in-depth understanding of your portfolio needs, we will evaluate which investment vehicles are best suited to guide your portfolio. 

    Step 4:   Bringing the plan together

    We will present you with a range of specific investment options consistent with your personalized asset allocation that seek to help you achieve your financial objectives.

    Step 5:   Tracking your progress

    A key to a prudent financial plan is to make sure that the client stays on track after the recommendations have been put into motion.  I will closely monitor the performance of your portfolio.  You and I will meet on a regular basis to discuss the progress of your investments and determine if any adjustments are needed.


     

     

    MISSION STATEMENT

    I focus on helping to build and preserve wealth for high net-worth individuals and organizations, and delivering world-class service and performance by structuring custom financial plans for my clients’ complex needs.  My business is driven by strategic planning; focused upon identifying strategies to major financial lifestyle issues including: education, retirement and estate planning.

    INVESTMENT PHILOSOPHY

    The governing principal of my investment philosophy is the preservation of buying power.  I structure portfolios with an emphasis on my client’s long-term goals; and therefore, advocate a disciplined approach to asset allocation (diversification).  I define success as helping my clients to obtain their investment goals with the least amount of risk possible.

    PROFILE

    I have over 18 years of experience in the financial services industry at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney.  Prior to joining the firm, I began my financial career with Price Waterhouse in management consulting.  I have built my business providing highly personalized investment advice and financial council.  As a Financial Consultant, I help clients to develop strategies to manage their personal and business finances.  I focus on wealth management, retirement planning, and estate planning. 

    I have a B. A. degree in Sociology from the University of Maryland and a M.B.A. in Finance from American University.  I am a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER (CFP®) and hold licenses for the following designations: Series 7, 63, 65, and 31.  I am proud to have been named to the prestigious Presidents Council and Blue Chip Council of Smith Barney.

    A local native, I am married to Rachel and have three daughters, Gaby, Maya and Carly and reside in Bethesda.  I enjoy spending time with my family and watching my children participate in sports and school activities.  I am involved with the University of Maryland Alumni Association and the University of Maryland M Club (former athletes of the University).  Away from the office, I enjoy reading and I am an avid golfer and runner. 

    PRODUCTS/SERVICES OFFERED

    Individual Investments ? Stocks ? Bonds ? Mutual Funds

    Money Managers ? Corporate Retirement Plans ? Annuities

    Individual Retirement Plans ? Retirement Planning ? Education Planning

    Estate Planning ? Wealth Management Planning ? Lending Services

    Insurance ? Long Term Care ? Risk Management

    Cash Management ? Endowments and Foundations

    Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC and its affiliates do not provide tax or legal advice. To the extent that this material or any attachment concerns tax matters, it is not intended to be used and cannot be used by a taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed by law.  Any such taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayer's particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor.

    1850 K Street, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20006

    phone (202) 857-5454 ? toll free (800) 424-3209 ? fax (202) 857-5460

    michael.r.svec@smithbarney.com

    http://fa.smithbarney.com/svec


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