• April 18, 2021
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    Today's Labor History
    This week’s Labor History Today podcast: Canal workers, gays & miners, Gandhi’s labor quote. Last week’s show: The Hardhat Riot.

    Some 300,000 members of the National Federation of Telephone Workers, soon to become CWA, strike AT&T and the Bell System. Within five weeks all but two of the 39 federation unions had won new contracts - 1947

    National Labor Relations Board attorney tells ILWU members to “lie down like good dogs,” Juneau, Alaska - 1947

    15,000 union janitors strike, Los Angeles - 2000
    photo: Militant/Carol Lesnick

    - David Prosten

    Today’s Labor Quote: Elizabeth Davis

    After teachers last month narrowly voted against striking over reopening plans, Davis said:
    “I thought the majority of teachers would vote for the collective action. Either way, we’re going to address the problem.”   

    Contact Elected Officials!
  • Tips on Writing Congress
    Updated On: Sep 25, 2014

    HOW TO CONTACT YOUR CONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATIVES
    To find your senators' and representative's phone numbers, you will find a congressional directory on our website www.actnat.com. Look under Contact Congress and use the first drop down tab, simply click on your state. Or you can call the U.S. Capitol Switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask for your senators' and/or representative's office.
    Remember that telephone calls are usually taken by a staff member, not the member of Congress. Ask to speak with the aide who handles the issue about which you wish to comment.
    After identifying yourself, tell the aide you would like to leave a brief message, such as: "Please tell Senator/Representative (Name) that I support/oppose (S.___/H.R.___)."
    You will also want to state reasons for your support or opposition to the bill. Ask for your senators' or representative's position on the bill. You may also request a written response to your telephone call.
      
    Tips On Writing Congress

    The letter is the most popular choice of communication with a congressional office. If you decide to write a letter, this list of helpful suggestions will improve the effectiveness of the letter:  NOTE: it is best to fax the letter rather then use the US Mail Service.
    1. Your purpose for writing should be stated in the first paragraph of the letter. If your letter pertains to a specific piece of legislation, identify it accordingly, e.g., House bill: H. R. ____, Senate bill: S.____.
    2. Be courteous, to the point, and include key information, using examples to support your position.
    3. Address only one issue in each letter; and, if possible, keep the letter to one page.

    Addressing Correspondence:
    To a Senator:
    The Honorable (full name)
    __(Rm.#)__(name of) Senate Office Building
    United States Senate
    Washington, DC 20510

    Dear Senator ____name___:
      
    To a Representative:
    The Honorable (full name)
    __(Rm.#)__(name of) House Office Building
    United States House of Representatives
    Washington, DC 20515

    Dear Representative ___name___
    Note:  When writing to the Chair of a Committee or the Speaker of the House, it is proper to address them as:
    Dear Mr. Chairman or Madam Chairwoman:
    Dear Madam Speaker or Mr. Speaker:
    Tip On E-mailing Congress
    Generally, the same guidelines apply as with writing letters to Congress. You will also find the e-mail address for your senators and representative on the ACT Web site at the Contact Congress Tab.

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